Water Safety

Drinking Water


Recreational Water

 


  

 

Public Health Inspectors at Algoma Public Health are continually working to ensure that you have access to safe drinking water.

TESTING WATER FROM YOUR HOME'S WELL 

All private home owners should test their well water 3-4 times per year to ensure that it is safe for drinking.
Water sampling bottles can be picked up at the Sault Ste. Marie Public Health Lab located at 160 McDougald Street in Sault Ste. Marie or at any Algoma Public Health office. If you have any concerns with your water, contact your local Algoma Public Health office.

How to take a water sample
Interpreting your sample results


FACT SHEETS ON CHEMICALS IN DRINKING WATER

Benzene Fact Sheet & Laboratories able to test for Benzene in Drinking Water
Sodium
Nitrates and Nitrites
Lead and your health
Trihalomethanes In Drinking Water

WELL CARE AND MAINTENANCE

Know your Well
How to Chlorinate your Well
How to Chloriate your Cistern
Well Construction
Installation of Well Pumps
Protection of Water Quality in Bored and Dug Wells
Protection of Water in Drilled Wells

RESOURCES FOR OPERATORS OF SMALL DRINKING WATER SYSTEMS

This section contains information for owners and operators of small water systems that provide drinking water to the public. For more information please contact your local Algoma Public Health office and ask to speak with a Public Health Inspector.

Introduction to operating a Small Drinking Water Systems
Well Record Request Form **
Directives: Get to Know the Law
Frequently Asked Questions
Operator Training
Regulations: Get to Know the Law
Response to Adverse Events
Sampling and Testing
Source Water
Treatment Options
Licensed Laboratories for Water Testing

**Please complete and mail this form to the Ministry of Environment address on the form to receive a copy of your well record. Requests are processed in 2 to 3 business days. Please call 1-866-396-9355 for additional information.**

REGULATIONS

Reg. 318/08 (Transitional - Small Drinking Water Systems)
Reg. 319/08 (Small Drinking Water Systems)

FORMS (These forms need to printed and faxed back to your local office)

4578-64E: Laboratory Services Notification (LSN) form
4579-68E: SDWS Identification form
4580-64E: Notice of Adverse Test Results and Issue Resoluation form

SIGNAGE FOR OPERATORS OF SMALL DRINKING WATER SYSTEMS (these signs are intended for advisories that Algoma Public Health issues)

Boil Water Advisory Sign (Bacterial Contamination)
Drinking Water Advisory Sign (Chemical Contamination)
Ministry of Environment 'Do not Drink this Water' sign
Ministry of Environment 'Water not Tested' sign

BOTTLED WATER AND WATER COOLERS

Bottled water is water sold to consumers in sealed containers. It can be represented as "spring" or "mineral" water. It can also be water from various sources that may have been treated to make it fit for human consumption and put in sealed containers for sale.

For additional information, please see:

How to clean and sanitize your Water Cooler
 


RECREATIONAL WATER

Public bathing beaches are sampled to ensure that water quality is safe for swimming and also surveyed for physical concerns.

Beaches can be closed due to high bacterial contamination, blue gree algae blooms, physical concerns or other reason that may be a health hazard such as a chemical spill in the area.

Public pools and spa's are also inspected by Public Health Inspectors for your health and safety. Public pool and spa regulations can be reviewed along with backyard pool safety.

When you swim, swim healthy!



Beach Warnings - testing will begin again in the summer of 2012
Signs to look for at the beach

RECREATIONAL WATER ILLNESSES

Giardiasis (Beaver Fever)
Cryptosporidiosis
Shigellosis
Swimmer's Itch

BLUE-GREEN ALGAE

Information about Blue-Green Algae
Blue-Green Algae Information for Cottagers and Home Owners
Blue-Green Algae Information for Drinking Water System Owners and Operators
Blue-green algae and their toxins

 



Inspection reports for public pools and beaches are available to the public by contacting Environmental Health at 705-759-5286 or by email.

  • Drowning is the second-leading cause of unintentional death among Canadian children between the ages of one and four.
  • Many toddlers drown when the guardian’s supervision is distracted "only for a moment".
  • A small child can drown in only a few inches of water - enough to cover the mouth and nose.

    POOL SAFETY TIPS

    1. Regularly oil the hinges and latches.
    2. Don't allow children to play in the pool area. Remove all toys, tricycles - anything a child might want to get - from the vicinity.
    3. Post CPR instructions and the 911 emergency number in the pool area.
    4. Keep lifesaving equipment, such as a pole, life preserver and rope – in the pool area. Hang them from the fence so people won't trip on them.
    5. Have a phone handy to the pool area. Do not answer the phone while your children are in the pool; use the phone only to call 911 should a problem occur.
    • Drowning occurs in less time than it takes to read the above safety message.
    • This summer, be your child’s lifeguard! Enroll in water safety. Contact your local Red Cross.
    Regularly check that the gate latches securely and that spring mechanisms work properly.

    Health Protection and Promotion Act - Public Pools
    Public Spas Regulation
    Spa Operator's Manual
    Pool Operator's Manual
    Pool and In-Ground Spa Drain Covers - Recall