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Vector borne diseases bulletin - PDF file (80 KB) 


West Nile Virus in Algoma: Prevention tips and 2015 summary


 Quick facts

 

  • West Nile virus is acquired from a bite by infected mosquitoes and can result in minor illness, or very rarely severe nervous system effects.
  • West Nile virus has been found in the bird population in the District of Algoma since 2008.
  • 2% of the mosquitoes trapped in 2015 were found to be the main type of mosquito that would carry the West Nile Virus.
  • No infected mosquitoes were found in 2015.
  • Less than 5 confirmed cases of West Nile virus have been reported in the District of Algoma since 2006, compared to 547 total in Ontario.1
  • 28 cases of West Nile virus were reported in Ontario in 2015.¹

Testing and Trapping in 2015

  • 16 sites across Algoma
  • 70 traps collected
  • 2, 636 mosquitoes examined

Test results for 2015

 

  • 2, 635 - mosquitoes examined
  • 70% - can not transmit West Nile virus
  • 28% - very low risk of carrying West Nile virus
  • 2% - highest risk of carrying West Nile virus

Lower your risk by:

 

  • Limit time outdoors from dusk to dawn
  • Wear light coloured, protective clothing
  • Use mosquito repellent with 'DEET'

Data source: ¹Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care, integrated Public Health Information System (iPHIS) database; Ontario Population Estimates and Projections, Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care, IntelliHEALTH ONTARIO. Accessed June 15 2016


Lyme disease in Algoma: Prevention tips and 2015 summary


Quick facts

 

  • Lyme disease is acquired from infected blacklegged tick bites and if left untreated, can result in neurological effects, recurring arthritis and, in very rare cases, death.
  • Lyme disease is becoming more common in Ontario. In 2010, 72 cases of Lyme disease were reported in Ontario compared to 359 cases in 2015, representing a 399% increase.¹
  • Algoma Public Health does tick dragging every spring and summer season to identify whether blacklegged ticks are present in the District of Algoma.
  • Algoma Public Health also investigates all reported human cases of Lyme disease and provides information on testing and treatment to clients and physicians.

Ticks submitted for testing by Algoma residents in 2015

 

  2015 2010-2014
Submitted for identification        24 ticks 9.2 ticks (yearly average)
Potential carriers 5 ticks (3 acquired from Michigan)         1.2 ticks (yearly average)
Positive for Lyme disease 1 tick (acquired from Michigan) 0 ticks (five year total)

Protect yourself

 

  • Search for ticks on your body after time in grassy areas
  • Wear closed footwear and socks
  • Cover skin with light coloured clothes
  • Use tick repellent with “DEET”

How to remove a tick

 

  1. Use fine-tipped tweezers to grasp the tick as close to the skin’s surface as possible.
  2. Pull upward with steady, even pressure while avoiding twisting or jerking as this may cause the mouth parts to break off.
  3. After removing the tick, clean the bite area and your hands-with rubbing alcohol, an iodine scrub or soap and water.

What to do with a removed tick

 

  1. Place in a secure container, one example being a screw-top medication bottle.
  2. Bring the tick to your local public health unit or health care professional for testing.

Data source: ¹Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care, integrated Public Health Information System (iPHIS) database; Ontario Population Estimates and Projections, Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care, IntelliHEALTH ONTARIO. Accessed June 15 2016