Algoma Public Health

  • Cleaning & Disinfecting
  • Back

Cleaning & Disinfecting

  • Facebook
  • Email

Regular cleaning and disinfecting of surfaces is important to reduce the risk of disease transmission from general surfaces and shared items.

 

Cleaning must always be the first step to remove dirt and debris from a surface and is necessary for a disinfectant to be effective.

 

Disinfecting will reduce disease-causing germs on surfaces.  The type of chemical/product used and the contact time – the time a surface remains wet with the disinfectant – must be taken into consideration to effectively disinfect surfaces.  The various options are outlined in the following printable poster:

 

Download: Proper Cleaning and Disinfection Practice


Step 1: Cleaning

 

  • Cleaning must always be the first step to remove dirt and debris from a surface and is necessary for a disinfectant to be effective
  • Clean with a detergent, water and friction and clean from least contaminated to most contaminated areas


Step 2: Disinfecting

 

  • Disinfectants are applied to a clean surface in order to kill disease-causing germs
  • Disinfectants must have a drug identification number (DIN) if approved for use in Canada (common household bleach and isopropyl alcohol are the only exceptions)
  • Always follow manufacturer’s instructions for use (MIFU). Read label for direction on: dilution and mixing, personal protective equipment (PPE) needed (e.g., gloves, goggles), surfaces appropriate for use, contact time, efficacy on specific organisms, and rinsing requirements
  • There are a variety of disinfectants in the market. Choose a disinfectant that is compatible with your surfaces and with contact times that fit your needs
  • Check the expiry date. If a product has expired, do not use. Discard expired product safely or return to manufacturer
  • Ensure the concentration of disinfectant is correct before use (i.e. use test strips)
  • Toys that will be mouthed should be rinsed thoroughly with water following disinfection
  • Do not use antiseptic wipes and other products intended for skin (i.e. alcohol-based hand rubs) on surfaces

  

 

Date of Creation: March 12, 2020

Last Modified: